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Gumboot December 2011

Working for Wetland's electronic newsletter

NEW FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEM ATLAS SHOWS WHICH SOUTH AFRICAN RIVERS AND WETLANDS SHOULD BE KEPT IN A NATURAL CONDITION

NEW FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEM ATLAS SHOWS WHICH SOUTH AFRICAN RIVERS AND WETLANDS SHOULD BE KEPT IN A NATURAL CONDITION
For some years now we have known that our freshwater ecosystems—our rivers, wetlands, lakes and pans—work hard in providing us with a range of services, like supply of freshwater, water purification and provision of natural products. We also know that freshwater ecosystems are the most threatened ecosystems globally, experiencing the greatest number of species extinctions.


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THE NFEPA ATLAS TRAINING

SNIPPETS
THE NFEPA ATLAS TRAINING
The new NFEPA atlas training and support for potential users has already begun. About 500 people from a range of organisations and sectors attended the three training sessions that took place in Cape Town, KwaZulu-Natal and Pretoria. The Cape Town training sessions alone saw about 250 people in attendance—because of the positive turnout the training had to be conducted over two days. This training was aimed at anyone who is involved in policy-making, planning or decision-making where freshwater ecosystems are concerned. It gave the participants a chance to discuss the atlas and ask questions where there was a need to. It is hoped that more training sessions will be organised for the remaining provinces sometime in the near future, so watch this space.

ANGIE MASHUDU PHALISO RETIRES

ANGIE MASHUDU PHALISO RETIRES

It was only four months ago that, in our Women's Month edition in August, we spoke about Angie Phaliso, the environmental programme manager for the Rand Water Foundation and her role in wetland rehabilitation. Little did we know that her term with Rand Water was rapidly coming to an end. She retired last month and unfortunately Working for Wetlands is one of many organisations that are already feeling the gap left by her departure. Over the past nine years she has worked tirelessly with 15 of Working for Wetlands projects benefitting more than 1 862 people in the process. She has been a true advocate for the environment making sure that if it is not wetland rehabilitation she is involved in, it is indigenous tree planting, all in an effort to avert climate change effects in our country. 
 
John Dini, Freshwater Director said, ''It is sad that we have to lose Angie at such a crucial time in South Africa. Our country has taken a long time to come to the realisation of how serious climate change is and our significant role in this year's Convention of Parties (COP17) has displayed just how willing and prepared our politicians are in dealing with climate change. It is a time when people with Angie's drive and passion for environmental conservation is highly needed. We wish Angie good luck in her future endeavours.''